Tag Archives: carbon monoxide

Dallas Indoor Air Quality Testing 214.912.4691 – Radon, IAQ, Mold Inspection and Testing & Rapid Onsite Results

DAYS / HOURS OF OPERATION  (text to with inquiries – 24 / 7 but please include physical address, square footage and email)
7 Days a Week  8 AM – 8 PM   (Central Standard Time)

Dallas Indoor Air Quality Testing

P100 Respirator with 2091 Filters by 3M

214.912.4691 – Through years of performing environmental testing in the Dallas / Fort Worth – DFW Metroplex area, ScanTech has evaluated numerous risk factors that impact human health from the perspectives of both short term (acute effects) and long term (chronic health issues) impacts in the occupational health realm.

ScanTech can check for the following key indoor air quality level indicators (many with time-based datalogging available) and have a report for you at the time of the onsite visit:

  • Formaldehyde (HCHO)
  • VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds)
  • Carbon Dioxide (CO2) – measurement of fresh air dilution that tracks with VOCs
  • Carbon Monoxide (CO) – a dangerous from combustion byproducts
  • Respirable Dust Particles in PM2.5 (fine) and PM10 (coarse) size regimes
  • Oxygen Levels
  • HEPA Filtration and other central air purifier efficiency (MERV Rating)
  • Pressure differentials between inside and outside (affects contamination potential)
  • Relative ventilation levels – critical to know in newer homes that are tightly built

Optional Testing

  • Mold Testing & Inspection including air samples, tape lifts and visual inspection
  • Bacterial, Microorganism, Parasite & Bio-Film issues
  • Radon Rn-222 Levels (alpha emitter lung carcinogen found in Texas including Dallas)
  • Ozone levels testing – ozone is a oxidizing respiratory irritant
  • Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) – toxic sewer gas that has a foul odor
  • City of Dallas Green Ordinance Post Construction IAQ Clearance Sampling for 804.2

along with atmospheric factors such as:

  • Temperature
  • Relative Humidity
  • Absolute Humidity
  • Mixing Ratio, Vapor Pressure, Dew Point
  • Barometric Pressure (to judge whether the structure is under positive or negative pressure with respect to the outside air)

Many residents of the Dallas / Fort Worth area suffer from the following symptoms, ailments, and diseases – much of which can be traced either directly to air quality and composition or is exacerbated by poor air quality:

  • Allergies & Sinus Infections – (high particulate counts and VOCs, formaldehyde)
  • Chronic Allergic Rhinitis – (bio-aerosols)
  • Eye irritation – (formaldehyde, hydrogen sulfide, VOCs)
  • Congestion – (high particulate counts and VOCs, formaldehyde)
  • Inflammation – (formaldehyde, VOCs)
  • Fatigue – (carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide)
  • Insomnia
  • Headaches – (carbon monoxide)
  • Dizziness – (carbon monoxide)
  • Cognitive issues including difficulty focusing
  • Nausea
  • Coughing – (high particulate counts, mold, MVOCs)
  • Asthma & other breathing difficulties – (MVOCs, high particulate counts, ozone)
  • Bronchitis – (irritation of the lung bronchi)

These issues can contribute to and/or be symptomatic of more serious ailments such as:

  • COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease)
  • Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis
  • Carbon Monoxide / Carbon Dioxide Poisoning
  • Autoimmune Disease
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Stroke
  • Lung Cancer
  • Leukemia
  • Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma
  • Neurological issues due to chemical exposure and/or oxygen deprivation

In many cases, a simple series of air quality tests that detect and report important metrics such as respirable particle levels, VOCs, formaldehyde levels, radon gas, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxygen levels, etc. can narrow down the issue(s) responsible. Very often, mitigation is relatively inexpensive and well worth the modest investment.

While ScanTech can make suggestions on how to clean up your air, we are not an equipment vendor or installer, so there is no conflict of interest in selling you products that you don’t need. (or that may make things worse)

ScanTech Residential Service Area Map Dallas and Fort Worth

ScanTech Residential Service Area Map Dallas and Fort Worth

Cities for radon / indoor air quality inspection services include: Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston, Austin, San Antonio, Plano, Highland Park, University Park, Park Cities, Arlington, Grapevine, Frisco, Denton, McKinney, Allen, Lewisville, Irving, Mesquite, Bedford, Euless, Richardson, Coppell, Grand Prairie, Garland, Addison, Farmers Branch, Rockwall, Carrollton, Parker, Rowlett, Lucas, Fairview, Park Cities, Keller, Roanoke, The Colony, Highland Village, Lake Dallas, Corinth, Prosper, Duncanville, Lancaster, Rowlett, Royse City, Trophy Club, Southlake and Hurst. Counties served include Dallas, Collin, Denton, Tarrant and Rockwall County.

New Homes and Carbon Dioxide Levels: The Overlooked Indoor Air Quality Health Hazard

One of the “mythologies” that I have heard from clients and real estate agents is something along the lines of “But the house is too new to have any air quality issues, isn’t it?” Actually, it is usually the opposite. Besides the fallacy that newer is necessarily better (how long do appliances last now compared to 30 years ago?) there are several reasons why air quality in a new home may be severely impaired compared to an older one.

  • The construction materials and potentially new furniture, carpet, linens, etc. are still outgassing (releasing chemical fumes) for weeks and months after the initial build.
  • All of the dust from construction has not necessarily been removed from the general air circulation with the finer, more dangerous fine and ultra-fine particulate matter known to stay suspended for weeks.
  • Unpacking of boxes and materials from the move can release contaminants that have now been imported into your home.
  • Houses in general are built more “tightly” than in the past with the aim of increased energy efficiency. As with any engineering design, there is almost always a trade-off or a compromise somewhere. In this case, you potentially cut down on the amount of fresh air and oxygen in exchange for saving money on your utility bill. This means increased CO2 (carbon dioxide levels) which is potentially hazardous to your health. Please note that I am not talking about carbon monoxide which is an entirely different gas.
  • There tends to be a synergistic relationship between CO2 levels and VOC (Volatile Organic Chemical) levels in a structure. Elevated carbon dioxide levels means that ventilation is inadequate, not just for human occupants but ALSO for proper outgassing of the chemical fumes discussed above. This is why levels of CO2 which exceed 1000 ppm (or 1%) is associated with Sick Building Syndrome. Normal outdoor atmospheric levels are 400 ppm.
  • Furthermore, chemoreceptors in the human body located in the aorta, carotid arteries and in the brain respond to increased CO2 levels by INCREASING the breathing rate. This means that consequently more chemicals and dust enter the lungs and bloodstream.
  • Excess levels of CO2 can rapidly build up, particularly in an enclosed space such as a smaller room with the door shut and no air circulation. This can begin manifesting as physical symptoms as described in the illustration below.
Carbon Dioxide Toxicity impact on Indoor Air Quality

Symptoms of Carbon Dioxide Toxicity

TRUE STORY – I investigated a very new home (less than a year old) in which I was called out because the 23 year old healthy son passed out unconscious and non-responsive. When checked out at the hospital, they could find nothing wrong. When I arrived and began testing, I found something very wrong as my carbon dioxide meter began alarming immediately and climbed to very high levels even inside of an open hallway on the second floor. The family had been complaining of fatigue and headaches within a week of moving in.

The official medical terminology for carbon dioxide toxicity / poisoning is known as “hypercampnia”. Please note that this is an entirely different issue from CARBON MONOXIDE poisoning which is discussed in a blog post here:

Carbon Monoxide Safety Levels and Indoor Air Quality